Economy in Digits – 02/01/2014


In the past couple of weeks I didn’t see any significant economic indicators in the news. However, we got a lot of data over last week.

United States

Driven by the fastest consumer spending in the last three years and a rise in exports, US GDP increased by 3.2% year-over-year in the 4th quarter.The calculations also showed a 1.9% increase in GDP across all of 2013, compared to 2.8% the previous year. The 2013 figures showed that a significant decrease in government spending due to the shutdown in October had dragged GDP figures down when compared to last year. That was of course accompanied by the extreme cold temperatures in the winter which also hampered the economy. However, the numbers are still positive and despite the continuation of tapering by the FED, the US still remains the safest economic harbor right now. As we’ll discuss soon, Emerging Markets are not doing too well right now.

united-states-gdp-growthTurkey and India

Both the Turkish Central Bank and the Indian Central Bank resorted to drastic interest rate hikes. In Turkey, a corruption probe against government officials had led to the resignation of various cabinet ministers. The following levels saw the Turkish Lira lose significant value and brought the Turkish Lira/US Dollar spot rate to unprecedented levels. To stop the devaluation, the Turkish Central Bank sold parts of its foreign reserves but it was to no avail. Finally, the Central Bank had enough and they raised interest rates sharply. The benchmark interest rate was raised from 4.5% to 10% and the over night lending rate was hiked from 7.5% to 12%. Following the rate hike, the Turkish Lira gained 4% against the US dollar. However, the crisis is yet to be averted. Even though the Lira gained in value after the Central Bank’s decision, the sell off creeped in again. This decision is surely to slow Turkish economic growth and that could prove crucial to determining the outcome of the upcoming local elections in March.

tlusd

On to India, another country that required a rate hike this past week. As I stated in an earlier post, India is struggling with high inflation and lackluster growth and just like Turkey, they will be having elections this year. However, the Indian Central Bank let everyone know that they are serious about battling inflation when they increased the repo rate by a quarter point to 8% and announced that they plan to reduce the inflation rate to 6% by 2016. As you can see from the graph below, the latest inflation figure in India is over 11%.

indiainflationGreat Britain

Another GDP figure came from Great Britain as GDP growth was announced to be 0.7% in the 4th quarter of 2013 and by 1.9% in 2013 overall.That figure might seem as slow as Shaq running down a basketball court however that is the fastest growing quarter that Great Britain has had since the 2008 economic crisis. The main force behind the growth was the services and the manufacturing sectors and evidences that slowly, eventually and oh so gradually, the British economy is picking itself up.

Historical Data Chart

EU

The Eurozone had been battling a rather unfamiliar problem, deflation, which is the opposite of inflation. To battle the deflation, the European Central Bank had decided to lower interest rates last month. However, we got new inflation figures from the Eurozone which don’t look so bright. Consumer price inflation across the Eurozone fell from 0.8% in December to 0.7% in January.. Even though the worst of the European debt crisis is behind us, deflation means that firms and individuals are more likely to hold off on spending money until the future, which could take a toll on growth. Even though I see it to be unlikely, European Central Bank officials stated that if matters get worse, they could resort to negative deposit rates for banks’ deposits at the European Central Bank.

Historical Data Chart

That was what made economic headlines this week. Stay tuned for more economic news in Economy in Digits in the following weeks.

“Economics is extremely useful as a form of employment for economists.”
-John Kenneth Galbraith

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