Emerging Markets in Emergency Mode


Despite how much we prayed for a peaceful and prosperous year, 2014 has started off with a crisis; this time in the Emerging Markets. In a previous Economy in Digits post, I had discussed how India and Turkey had responded to large losses in the value of their currencies by raising interest rates. In the following days, the sell-off in stocks and currencies extended to other Emerging Markets. If you’d like to get a better understanding of Emerging Markets, feel free to check out one of my earlier posts regarding upcoming Emerging Market elections, which I will touch on shortly. As you can see from the following graph provided by Bloomberg, the MSCI has been performing very poorly. Lets take a look at what is causing all this mess in the countries that not so long ago were deemed to lead the world out of the global economic crisis.

emerging markets index

The first reason for the rapid sell off of Emerging Market stocks is a topic that my regular readers might be getting sick of hearing, but its tapering. The main reason why most Emerging Markets fared so well after the economic crisis of 2008 was that central banks in developed nations pushed interest rates to almost 0%. Seeing as how they would make almost no money on investing in developed countries, investors sent their money to do its magic in Emerging Markets where interest rates are higher. Combined with an increase in price of global commodities, which is an important source of income for many Emerging Markets, the inflow of foreign funds caused Emerging Market economies to skyrocket. However, in the last week of January, the FED decided to continue tapering by reducing its bond purchase program by another $10 billion. This is causing interest rates to rise in developed markets, especially in the United States. Thus, investors are now doing the opposite of what they did in 2008 and are now pulling their money away from Emerging Markets and are putting their cash back in developed markets such as the US and the UK.

Another reason why Emerging Markets are in trouble is because of China. China had been the poster child of Emerging Market success in the past several years. However, as the country reaches a limit on urbanization and its population transitions from rural to middle class, the government has had to enact reforms that inevitably slow down the Chinese economy. Combined with the fact that the Chinese government has also tried to reduce credit in the Chinese economy due to fears of a credit bubble, some investors now fear of a “hard landing” for the Chinese economy. These fears were strengthened in the final week of January as Chinese officials announced that the country’s Purchasing Mangers Index (PMI), a monthly manufacturing report that surveys private manufacturers, contracted for the first time since 2008.The reason why China is so crucial to other Emerging Market nations is that China is one of the world’s largest importer of commodities. On the other hand, most Emerging Markets are net exporters of commodities. Thus a slowdown in China would mean less demand for commodities from other Emerging Markets, causing a chained slow down across all Emerging Market nations. Here is a video that further breaks down whats going on in China.

Finally, we have the isolated incidents across individual Emerging Markets. In an earlier post, I discussed the political crisis created from a corruption probe in Turkey and rampant inflation in India. However, other Emerging Markets have also had their own troubles. Thailand has been in social and political turmoil since November of last year. Protesters have taken to the streets across Thailand to force Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra to resign and postpone the elections that was supposed to occur in the beginning of this month. Protesters see Mrs. Yingluck’s regime as corrupt and wishes her to reform the Thai political structure before elections are held again. In fact protesters managed to postpone the elections which were planned on February 2nd. To learn more about the events in Thailand, feel free to read more about it on the BBC.

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To make matters a tad bit worse, as if it wasn’t bad enough already, the Argentinian economy is rapidly deteriorating. On February 13, Argentinian inflation was announced to be at 44%. That is at levels where one would call it hyperinflation. Argentina had once been a prosperous nation. But a crisis in 2001 has left it with naively populist governments that have slowly shut itself out of global capital markets. The gradual downfall of the Argentinian economy is an issue I will cover in another post but for now check out this post by the Economist to get a better understanding.

So what happens now? Are Emerging Markets doomed for eternal decline? First of all, even though most people like to lump all Emerging Markets together, not all countries are the same and not all have suffered greatly over the past couple of months. In fact, in January, shares in the MSCI Indonesia rose by 4.6% while the market in the Philippines gained 2.4%. These countries have done well to turn the money that was invested in their economies into long term growth opportunities that improve their trade balances over the long run and increase the education and productivity of their population. However, many of the Emerging Markets  that experienced rapid economic growth in 2010 and 2010 were fueled by short term foreign investments and increasing consumer demand which required constant to satisfy. As foreign investors pull out and domestic demand cools, these economies will start looking back to 2010 and 2011 as the glory years of the past. Countries such as Turkey, India and Brazil, which were on the verge of double digit growth back in those years will now find it difficult to reach 4% let alone 5% growth. Even though Emerging Markets may not collapse and fall out of favor with all investors, I think the markets in these nations will revert to a new normal which is slower growth.

“So much of what happened to India late last year and early into 2011 is the same story we’ve seen with other big emerging markets, and that is that investors started to realize that the growth trajectory in India would have to get moderated by tightening policy.”
-Jerrry A. Webman

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